Tesla Files SaMDES Patent Application

Regular readers with long memories may recall that way back when in November 2017 we here at V2G UK announced the launch of our Static and Mobile Distributed Energy Storage project? Those readers can no doubt imagine my surprise when I recently discovered an article by Sebastian Blanco in Forbes magazine announcing that:

There’s the grid, the evolving smart grid and then there’s no grid at all. That’s the paradigm that Tesla is exploring in a new patent application, Number 16/186390, which calls for controlling energy generation interactions (solar roofs, anyone? ) that bypass the electric grid.

Here’s the monochrome graphic that Sebastian extracted from Tesla’s patent application:

SebastianBlanco_Tesla _Patent_Screen-Shot-2019-03-29

To my way of thinking that’s remarkably similar to the left and central portions of the much more colourful “prior art” in the banner that’s been proudly displayed at the top of every page on this web site for many years now. Do you suppose that Elon Musk is an avid reader of the V2G UK web site? If so perhaps he first arrived here way back in 2014 when I took Tesla’s marketing mavens to task over their propensity to be “economical with the truth” concerning open source electric vehicles.

Tesla’s recent US patent application includes the following paragraph:

This application is a continuation application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 15/153,037 entitled “ENERGY GENERATION INTERACTIONS BYPASSING THE GRID,” filed on May 12, 2016, which is herein incorporated by reference in its entirety for all purposes.

That seems to refer to this 2018 patent assigned to “SolarCity Corporation, San Mateo, CA”. Does the US patent office by any chance have a number to call to advise them of occurrences of “patenting the bleedin’ obvious”?

Exhibit 1: https://web.archive.org/web/20140606031404/http://www.v2g.co.uk:80/blog/

2 thoughts on “Tesla Files SaMDES Patent Application

  1. America First !! (= Everybody else last).

    I expect the patent will be granted and you will have to go a a USS Federal Court to stop it.

    Once upon a time a US company patented the genes of an indigenous tribe from Papua New Guinea. The tribe had to go to the USA to stop it.
    https://www.nytimes.com/1995/11/27/business/patents-recent-patent-papua-new-guinea-tribe-s-cell-line-prompts-outrage-charges.html

    https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2013/06/supreme-court-blocks-patenting-of-genomic-dna/

    The US Supreme Court, in a nearly unanimous ruling (Scalia joined the majority for most of the decision; more on that below), has held that a piece of DNA that occurs naturally is not eligible for patenting. This means that any sequences that are normally present in the human genome—or that of any other organism—cannot be the subject of patent infringement.

    The case grew out of patents held by Myriad Genetics, a company that has had a monopoly on testing for genetic defects in genes associated with breast and ovarian cancer. The genes in question, BRCA1 and BRCA2, were first isolated by scientists from the University of Utah who then patented their sequences. The university later transferred the patents to Myriad, which developed further patents to cover more detailed aspects of the testing process.b

  2. Quite so Matthew. Make America great again! Patenting the human genome. Whatever next?

    Here is the Wikipedia article on the concept of a microgrid:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microgrid

    Here too is clause 5 from Tesla’s recent patent application:

    According to one embodiment, a device for managing power flow between a plurality of electrical systems is described. In some examples, the device may comprise an electrical cable configured to connect, independent of connections to a power grid, a first end-user electrical system of the plurality of electrical systems to a second end-user electrical system of the plurality of electrical systems. The device may also comprise an inverter, coupled with the electrical cable, configured to change a type of power from a direct current form to an alternating current form. The device may also comprise a memory configured to store computer-executable instructions, and a processor configured to access the memory and execute the computer executable instructions. In some cases, the device may be configured to identify power generated by a photovoltaic cell of the first end-user electrical system of the plurality of electrical systems. The device may also be configured to change the type of the power, utilizing the inverter, from the direct current form to the alternating current form and/or identify a power draw of first amount of the power from the second end-user electrical system of the plurality of electrical systems. In some examples, the device may be configured to control a first flow of the first amount of the power over the electrical cable from the first end-user electrical system of the plurality of electrical systems to the second end-user electrical system of the plurality of electrical systems based at least in part on the power draw. Additionally, the device may be configured to receive a second flow of the power over the electrical cable from the second end-user electrical system of the plurality of electrical systems and / or monitor relative power flow between the plurality of electrical systems based at least in part on the first flow of the power and the second flow of power over the electrical cable.

    Perhaps Elon Musk will proudly announce at some point in the not too distant future that Tesla have “open sourced” their microgrid patents? Here’s how their allegedly “open source EV” worked out:

    A Closer Look at Tesla’s Open-Source Patent Pledge

    Tesla’s Patent Pledge presents companies in the electric vehicle field with a tremendous opportunity, but one that also carries some substantial risk. Agreeing to abide by the Pledge could significantly curtail a company’s ability to protect, defend, and assert its own intellectual property.

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